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State Rural Rehab Programs

The following is information about the rural rehabilitation programs in each member state of NARRC. Any changes to this document will be posted on the main page under State-To-State Awareness. If you are looking for programs from a specific state, use the links in the index to go directly to that state's programs.

Index

ALABAMA

Program/Project Title: Rural Home and Land Loans
Contact Person: Fred Lovvorn – 334-277-8950
Cost: Variable Up to $85,000
Loan Amounts: Variable rate loans up to $85,000 on houses and or Land with greater amounts with 20 percent equity position.
Target Group: Young Farmers and or rural residents who need financial assistance and rehabilitation as a result of extreme adversity, hardships, or misfortune.

Description:
This program provides persons who desire to remain in rural areas owner financing for housing or land. Loans can be made up to 100 percent of the appraised value of the property if other credit conditions are favorable. Larger loans may be extended in order to address the needs of rural America. Applications are mostly obtained by word of mouth, real estate agents, attorneys, and banks.

In order to assist rural people in the rehabilitation process, great emphasis is placed on creative financing.

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ARIZONA

Program/Project Title: Arizona FFA Foundation
Contact Person: Dennis Fiscus
Cost: $15,000 - $30,000
Target Group: Arizona Agricultural Education and FFA Members

Description:
Arizona uses Rural Rehabilitation Trust monies to provide funding for the operations of the Arizona Agricultural Education/FFA Foundation. The Foundation, in turn, provides funding to Arizona FFA Chapters, the University of Arizona Agricultural Education Department, the Arizona Agricultural Teachers Association and the Arizona FFA Alumni Association for awards, internships, scholarships, education, and travel stipends for award winners to national competitions.


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ARKANSAS

Program/Project Title: Student loans to rural Arkansas residents by
Arkansas Rural Endowment Fund, Inc.
Contact Person: Tony Minicozzi, General Manager
Cost: Almost $5.3 million in loan advances per year with administrative expenses at 2.12% of the ending fund balance
Target Group: Rural Arkansas residents

Description:
The number of individuals receiving loans since the program began in 1959 will exceed 17,000. Many of these borrowers report they would have been unable to reach their educational goals without Arkansas Rural Endowment Fund (AREF) assistance. The loan recipients are evenly distributed throughout the state, and loans are available to most Arkansas public, private, and proprietary schools for higher education.

Loans are packaged in coordination with other forms of financial assistance by financial aid officers at educational institutions to avoid over awarding. AREF is a participating lender in the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). In this program, the subsidized Stafford loan borrowers qualify for their “in-school” interest to be paid by the federal government. The AREF participates in all three types of loans in the FFELP: Subsidized, Unsubsidized Stafford and Parent Loan.

There are numerous higher education institutions in Arkansas that have never applied to participate in the federal loan programs or have opted to discontinue participation for various reasons. This group consists of state community colleges, satellite campuses, and miscellaneous proprietary schools. These schools rely on the AREF private, unsecured loan for assistance to their students. This loan, which was initiated in 1959, earns a low interest rate (5% in school) with no payments required until six months after school attendance has ceased. The rate is increased to7.25% for the repayment period. In the early years, the rates of interest charged were 3¾% in school and 6% during repayment. AREF experience with the private loan has been excellent. Millions have been loaned in addition to the amount loaned in the FFELP since the beginning. Losses are currently running well below 5% of principal.



Program/Project Title: AREF Memorial Scholarship Program
Contact Person: Tony Minicozzi, General Manager
Cost: $2000 per annum, plus promotional materials and staff time
Target Group: Rural Arkansas high school seniors

Description:
The Arkansas Rural Endowment fund, Inc. Board of Directors voted unanimously to begin AREF’s first-ever scholarship program to dovetail with their well-established loan program offerings.

The scholarship program is to begin modestly with two (2) $1000 scholarships awarded annually, beginning with the 2009-10 academic school year. As circumstances permit, the Board of Directors may choose to increase both the number of scholarships awarded, as well as the dollar amounts.

These two scholarships will be memorials made to honor the service of Mr. J.C. Portis, a founding member of the AREF Board of Directors, and Mr. E.B. Whitaker, a visionary and first general manager of AREF.

The intent of this program is to be another tool to assist rural Arkansans in coping with the continued costs associated with higher education.

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COLORADO

Program/Project Title: Direct Loan Program
Contact Person: Kenneth Miller, President; Betty Pickett, Executive Secretary
Cost: All funds available
Target Group: Young farmers and ranchers starting or expanding.

Description:
Direct or low-interest livestock and real estate loans are made to applicants who meet CRRC eligibility requirements.

1. Direct livestock loans are structured up to (5) five years at low interest for the purchase of commercial-grade beef cattle. Similar loans are available for dairy cows and sheep. The maximum loan limitation is $60,000 per borrower. CRRC will also consider short-term loans (one year or less) for the purchase of livestock for summer grazing and winter feed pasture.

2. Low interest real estate loans are structured up to a maximum of (15) fifteen years.

Maximum loan with a first-lien position is $200,000. Maximum loan for a second-lien position is (1/3) one-third of the appraised value, not to exceed $100.000. Applicants pay for the land appraisal and closing costs.

All applicants are interviewed by our loan representatives. Applicants must show the need and ability to man the loan and the physical resources to care for the livestock.

Most loans are closed at the applicant’s local bank, where the paperwork is processed and the funds are delivered.

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FLORIDA

Program/Project Title: Real Estate Loans to Rural Residents
Contact Person: Sonny Roberts, Executive Director
Cost: Loans made as funds are available
Target Group: Small farmers and rural residents

Description:
Florida Rural Rehabilitation Cooperation presently makes low cost housing loans to small farmers and rural residents on homestead property. Our current interest rate is 6% fixed, simple interest. The borrower pays no fees, no points, no origination fee, or preparation fees. Our maximum loan is $150,000; our maximum loan term is thirty years. Funds are used as they become available on a revolving basis. We do not acquire funds from outside sources.

If the loan involves the construction of a new home, the client is encouraged to consider building their home to Energy Star requirements. At completion of construction the home is tested and, upon passing, issued as Energy Star certificate. Florida Rural Rehabilitation Corporation will issue a check for $1,000.00 to each client that provides proof of certification, and they will recap the benefits of an energy efficient home for many years.



Program/Project Title: FRRC Scholarships
Contact Person: Sonny Roberts, Executive Director
Cost: Various Grants
Target Group: Students in college of agriculture

Description:
Over many years we have cooperated with a number of two year and four year colleges in our state to set up scholarship funds for students from rural areas pursuing degrees in agricultural sciences. Interest only, from the fund, is used each year, leaving the principle intact. One of our programs includes assistance to place-bound students pursuing four-year degrees in agriculture at locations other than the main campus. Due to physical, family and monetary constraints, many students are unable to pursue a degree away from home. In cooperation with several junior, community and four-year colleges, the University of Florida is offering students the chance to stay at home and earn a degree they would have previously not been able to earn.

In the past, Florida Rural Rehabilitation Corporation has been involved in a wide variety of activities beneficial to our state. We have made participation and self help housing loans with the Farmers Home Administration, student loans, grants to 4-H and FFA, operating loans to small farmers, and funded a rural Habitat for Humanity home. We have also made grants to a local Health Clinic that serves rural residents in eight local counties. Our current focus is funding of new home construction on homestead property, often with the home owner serving as his own contractor/builder.

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GEORGIA

Program/Project Title: Insured Loan Program
Contact Person: Thomas Carter, Executive Director
Cost: N/A
Target Groups: Farmers and Agribusinesses

Description:
Georgia Development Authority (GDA), as the succeeding entity of the Georgia Rural Rehabilitation Corporation and the Georgia Livestock Development Authority, is responsible for the administration of the original Rural Rehabilitation Assets in the state of Georgia. GDA is governed by seven board members who include the Commissioner of Agriculture as Chairman, the State Auditor, and the Commissioner of Industry and Trade for the state as ex-officio members and four agriculture leaders and/or businessmen appointed by the governor for four-year terms. GDA’s day-to-day operations are managed by the executive director, who is hired by the GDA Board and is charged with the responsibility of managing operations.

GDA’s use of the Rural Rehabilitation Assets is through an insured agricultural loan program that works as follows:

The loan applications are submitted directly to GDA from farmers and agribusinesses throughout Georgia. Upon receipt of the application, a loan request is reviewed and the credit risk is analyzed. If it is determined to be an acceptable risk, the loan is recommended for approval by the GDA Board of Directors or Executive Committee. Upon approval, a commitment letter is then issued and the loan can go to a local attorney for closing. After closing and receipt of the final papers, the loan can be sold to a local bank and insured by GDA. Even though the loan has been sold, GDA retains servicing and collecting the loan.

GDA provides adjustable and fixed rate loan products with repayment terms that match the cash flow of the operation. GDA retains one half of one percent for servicing the loan when it is sold. In the event the loan goes into non-accrual, GDA buys the loan back and continues the collection and retains the the responsibility for any loan loss which might be incurred upon collection. loan.

Local banks find it advantageous to have a relationship with GDA because the loans are 100% guaranteed and the FDIC does not count the loan in the bank’s asset-to-loan ratio due to the fact they are 100% GDA guaranteed. No bank has ever incurred a loss on a loan purchased from GDA.

In addition to the loan program, GDA grants scholarships each year to rising college freshmen that declare agricultural career paths and also supports many agricultural groups including 4 -H, FFA, and Georgia Young Farmers Association.

GDA is a quasi state entity and is completely self-supported. Its Board of Directors and management are proud of GDA's contributions to Georgia’s rural economy and society. As of June 30, 2013, GDA had loans outstanding in excess of $75.68 million with a net worth of approximately $54.67 million.



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IOWA

Program/Project Title: Loan Participation Program
Contact Person: Tammy Nebola, Program Specialist
Cost: Total loan volume to date of $6,484,779. Utilizes Rural Rehabilitation Trust Fund; self-funded with application and closing fees.
Target Group: Low income and beginning farmers

Description:
This program assists qualified low-income farmers to more readily secure loans from participating lenders by supplementing the borrower’s down payment. It also reduces lender’s risk since the IADD provides a “last in-last out” loan participation for the financial institution. Maximum loan amount of $150,000. Closing fee of 1.25 percent of participated amount.

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KANSAS

Program/Project Title: First Mortgage Real Estate Loans
Contact Person: Donald L. Jacka, Jr., Executive Director, Member of the Board of Directors
Cost: Maximum amount loan per each loan $250,000, case by case decision to exceed this amount
Target Group: Farmers who qualify for the real estate lending program previously administrated by the Farmers Home Administration, now the Farm Service Agency (FSA)

Description:
These are loans made for the purchase of land for the use by Kansas farmers in the production of agricultural products. These loans were made in conjunction with FSA’s predecessor, the Farmers Home Administration. In these loans, KHRC provided the first ½ of the funding and secured a first mortgage to the purchased land. FSA provided the second half of the funding and took a second mortgage. The loans provided for 100% of the funding for the farmer to purchase the land. The maximum amount loaned on each loan by KHRC is $250,000 with this amount exceeded in a case by case decision by the Loan Committee. These loans were typically made for maturity after 20 years but may be amortized for a thirty-year period with a balloon payment at twenty years. Over the years, KHRC participated in approximately 400 such loans with 30 outstanding loans, at present, totalling $3,200,000.00.



Program/Project Title: First Mortgage Bridge Loan
Contact Person: Donald L. Jacka, Jr., Executive Director, Member of the Board of Directors
Cost: Maximum amount loan per application is $250,000, case by case decision to exceed this amount
Target Group: Farmers who qualify for the real estate lending program previously administered by the Farmers Home Administration, now the Farm Service Agency (FSA)

Description:
In conjunction with the FSA First Mortgage Loan Program, this program provides a vehicle to lend the total amount of the land ownership loan awaiting federal funding. This allows the buyer and seller to consummate the land purchase at the time that they desire, not dictated by the USDA, cash flow time frame.



Program/Project Title: Agricultural Operating Loans
Contact Person: Donald L. Jacka, Jr., Executive Director/ Member of the Board of Directors
Cost: Maximum amount loaned per each loan $200,000, case by case decision to exceed this amount
Target Group: Farmers requiring agricultural operating funds who do not qualify for commercial financing

Description:
Beginning in 1989, KHRC began this program of providing agricultural operating loans to farmers who could not qualify for commercial financing. These low interest rate loans are made through either an FSA subordination or directly to the producer. These operating loans are to finance the necessary crop inputs and are seasonal in nature, having a maximum term limit of 12 months. The crops produced serve as the security for these loans, which are to be repaid upon harvest. There is a $200,000 maximum amount placed on each loan with a case by case decision to exceed this amount. To date, KHRC has made 1500 such loans and now have approximately 50 loans outstanding, in the amount of $2,000,000.00.



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LOUISIANA

Program/Project Title: Mondart Fellowship Application
Contact Person: T.C. Chachere, President, LRRC
Cost: $10,000
Target Group: Students in the College of Agriculture Attending LSU

Description:
The Mondart Fellowship is a scholarship program established to assist students who are members of rural families that have career objectives in the area of agriculture. The scholarships are made for $1,000 per year and awarded to eight to twelve students. These students can continue on the scholarships for four years if they maintain a 2.5 GPA, have full-time student status, and continue pursuing any major in the College of Agriculture.

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MICHIGAN

Program/Project Title: 4-H/FFA Special Projects Loan
Contact Person: Marion Weers, President
Cost: $100,000 or more per year
Target Group: 4-H and FFA members

Description:
Loans are available at low interest rates (5%) for 4-H and FFA members to help them purchase animals to raise for show at the county or state fairs. Repayment terms are very lenient and no payment is expected until the animal has been sold at the fair auction. Loans are also made for multi-year breeder projects and small crop projects. Special repayment terms are negotiated with each borrower providing for payments over a period for up to four years. The program provides young people an opportunity to experience a “hands on” loan process and promotes the importance of learning to repay an indebtedness on a timely basis.



Program/Project Title: Tuition Assistance for Rural and Farm Families (TARFF)
Contact Person: Marion Weers, President
Cost: $500,000+ available each year
Target Group: Members of farm families, those closely associated to agricultural activities, and residents of small rural communities

Description:
TARFF is a student loan program started in July 1997 to supplement existing loan and/or grant programs or can replace other loan programs. Although loan amounts are determined from amount(s) of tuition and/or books and required equipment for classes, the borrower is free to use the funds for any school related expenses not met by the programs. Interest rate is 8% with “prompt pay bonus” options for early payment or extended good repayment. There is no maximum loan amount or minimum attendance requirement.

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MISSISSIPPI

Program/Project Title: Farm Real Estate and Rural Housing Loans BOAC and Scholarship Program
Contact Person: John W. Teel, President, MRRC
Cost: Approximately $3,500,000
Program Goals: Our board of directors is made up of people with a concern for rural Mississippi and the desire to use our funds, our experience, and our knowledge to develop programs that will increase the efficiency of the participants and enable them to enjoy a better way of life. Our records show these goals are being accomplished.
Target Group: Future Farmers of America (boys and girls), needy farm families that qualify for agricultural service loans or grants

Description:
Mississippi Rural Rehabilitation Corporation (MRRC) realizes its primary function is to improve rural farm family living. To do this, emphasis is given to making farm real estate and rural housing loans in participation with Farmers Home Administration. Any available funds that are not used for these purposes are invested in federal securities. Any funds above the cost of administrating the program are used for educational grants. These include BOAC projects, scholarships, bull grant program to FFA members and other programs that would benefit the participant and demonstrate to the community its values. The farm real estate and rural housing loans have helped many farm families to become more stable, better farmers, and better citizens. There has been a great improvement in their standard of living.

In October 1986, the MRRC Board of Directors initiated a Bull Grant Program for the benefit of FFA members in Mississippi. The recipient must qualify for a Farmers Home Administration Loan, be financially unable to purchase such a bull, and must be an active FFA member. The FFA member and his guardian must agree to develop the bull in accordance with high standards directed by his or her Vo-Ag teacher, to show the bull at two state livestock shows, and keep and use the bull to improve the families’ beef herd for a period of five years. The family may continue to use the bull if needed; otherwise they may make whatever disposition is desired.

Since the beginning of the program, 432 of the best bulls that could be bought have been granted to FFA members. As an indication of the quality of these bulls and the efficiency of the FFA members, particularly all of them have placed in the upper half of their show class. Many of them have won their class, as well as being selected Grand and Reserve Champion. They have also had a great impact on the improvement of the family herd.

Our records indicate these bulls sire an average of 20 cows per year and are used for a period of approximately five years. This means approximately 100 calves during the service age of a bull. Many of the heifers have been retained in the family herd and have done much to improve the quality. Depending upon the market price of the calves, the ones sold have increased in value over the previous calves from $50 to $100 per calf.



Program/Project Title: Endowment - Mississippi State University & Alcorn State University
Contact Person: John W. Teel, President
Cost: Approximately $40,000
Target Group: Scholarship for full-time agricultural students

Description:
$20,000 will be granted to each of the two universities initially, and annually thereafter as money is available. The program will enable students who receive scholarships to continue with their studies. The scholarship is designed for full-time students enrolled in agriculture, who are from rural areas of the state and who are at least sophomores with a 3.0 grade point average.

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MISSOURI

Program/Project Title: Missouri Alternative Loan Program
Contact Person: Tony Stafford
Cost: $1,000
Target Group: Missouri farm families

Description:
The Missouri Department of Agriculture recognizes the economic stability of some Missouri farm families can be enhanced with the secondary income of an alternative enterprise; a venture that does not fall within the confines of conventional farming.

The Missouri Alternative Loan Program, which is managed by the Missouri Department of Agriculture, was developed to help farmers obtain the necessary credit to begin an alternative enterprise. It is available to Missouri farmers who are unable to obtain credit at comparable rates and terms.

The Missouri Alternative Loan is available for use by Missouri farmers to finance the production, processing, and marketing needs of an alternative enterprise.

The alternative agriculture enterprise will produce an additional source of income. An alternative enterprise is one that does not fall within the confines of conventional farming as determined by the Department of Agriculture. Maximum loan $20,000, interest rate 7.5%, and maximum term five years.



Program/Project Title: Crop and Livestock Loan Program
Contact Person: Tony Stafford
Cost: $50,000
Target Group: Missouri FFA and 4-H Club Members

Description:
The Crop and Livestock Loan Program provides financial benefits to Missouri youth who undertake crop and livestock production projects. To encourage Missouri 4-H and FFA students to participate in the Crop and Livestock Loan Program, which aids them in the following: development and gaining responsibility, experience in working with livestock or crops, education in financial management, and self satisfaction of completing a project.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture will guarantee 50% of the loan made to a 4-H or FFA member to finance a supervised project for a period of two years. It is also beneficial when making these loans; the lender is cultivating prospective customers.



Program/Project Title: Building Our American Communities Grant Program (BOAC)
Contact Person: Tony Stafford
Cost: $18,000
Target Group: Missouri FFA Chapters and 4-H Clubs

Description:
The Building Our American Communities (BOAC) Grant Program provides financial assistance for the development and advancement of Missouri rural communities.

Missouri 4-H Clubs and FFA Chapters are eligible to apply for this competitive grant. The state is divided into six districts to encourage increased participation in community maintenance and growth. Grant awards are limited to applications from each specific district. Competition for the $500 grants are based on project applications submitted for review by a selection committee of four judges.



Program/Project Title: Missouri Agribusiness Academy (MAbA)
Contact Person: Tony Stafford
Cost: $20,000
Target Group: Missouri high school sophomores who are active members of a 4-H class, FFA chapter, or from a Missouri farm family

Description:
The Missouri Agribusiness Academy is a program sponsored by the Missouri Department of Agriculture through use of the Rural Rehabilitation Funds to provide selective Missouri high school students a chance to explore the vast agribusiness resources over the state. The main object of the Academy is to provide an opportunity for the students to view various facets of agriculture, visit agribusinesses, and meet leaders in agriculture, government, and education. Other objectives of the Academy are to aid them in developing communication and educational skills and personal development. Through participation in the Missouri Agribusiness Academy, the students will be able to view firsthand many career opportunities available in agriculture and plan their future career goals accordingly. (The program consists of a two-day orientation program and a four-day tour.)

Academic students are selected through a competitive writing application and oral interview processes.

Program/Project Title: Missouri Bridge Loan Program
Contact Person: Tony Stafford
Cost: $1,000
Target Group: Missouri farm families approved for EQIP or SWCD cost-share funding

Description:
The Bridge Loan Program allows Missouri producers who have been approved by USDA NRCS, through the USDA NRCS Environment Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) or the Soil and Water Conservation Program/District (SWCD) to be eligible for a short-term loan from the Missouri Department of Agriculture. Loans are available at a fixed rate of 5.9 percent for the amount obligated to the producer by USDA NRCS or SWCD for a term up to one year.

Producers must first apply at either their local USDA NRCS office or their Soil and Water Conservation District office. Once approved by NRCS and/or SWCD, producers may apply for the Bridge Loan. Upon receipt of the required documents, loan funds will be dispersed to the producer. The cost -share money received by the farmer pays off the principal balance of the loan. The farmer will be responsible for the loan. The farmer will be responsible for the monthly interest, plus an application fee of $25.00.

Program/Project Title: Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Program
Contact Person: Tony Stafford
Cost: $1,000
Target Group: Missouri farm families and rural agribusiness

Description:
The Agribusiness Revolving Loan Program offers financing to the value-added agriculture enterprises, agriculture support business, marketers or retailers of agricultural products, and businesses with emerging agricultural technologies that are located in rural communities with less than 25,000 population.

Loans may be made for the costs associated with starting, acquiring, operating or expanding a qualifying Missouri agribusiness. Loans will finance no more than 50% of the project cost, with a maximum loan of $75,000, fixed rate of 5 percent, and $50 application fee. Loans CANNOT be made for agricultural production.

The program is offered in cooperation with the USDA Rural Development Intermediary Relending Program.



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MONTANA


Program/Project Title: Junior Agricultural Loan Program
Contact Person: Walt Anseth
Cost: N/A
Target Group: 4-H and FFA Members aged 9-21 who are unable to obtain reasonable financing.

Description:
Loans are made up to 90% of first year expenses for agribusiness and livestock projects. Youth ages 9-11 may borrow up to $3,500, and those aged 12-21 may borrow up to $8,500 for a maximum term of 5 years.



Program/Project Title: Rural Assistance Loan Program
Contact Person: Walt Anseth
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Agribusiness people over age 18 who are unable to obtain reasonable financing.

Description:
Applicant must have a signed denial from a lender. Loans are made for operating expense, capital expenditures, livestock, and real estate. Loans can be made with an 80% loan to value ration for a maximum loan value of $75,000. Maximum terms are; operating - 1 year, capital expenditures - 7 years, and real estate - 10 years.



Program/Project Title: FSA Subordination Loan Program
Contact Person: Walt Anseth
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Borrowers unable to acquire operating capital from commercial lenders.

Description:
A maximum loan of $90,000 may be made to an eligible FSA borrower for annual operating costs providing the borrower has a positive net worth, positive cash flow, good record with FSA, and 60% loan to value ratio.



Program/Project Title: Building Our Montana Communities
Contact Person: Walt Anseth
Cost: $600 annually
Target Group: FFA Chapters

Description:
Grants are given to three FFA chapters having the first, second, and third placed BOAC projects in a statewide competition.



Program/Project Title: Rural Community Development
Contact Person: Walt Anseth
Cost: $1,500
Target Group: 4-H Club

Description:
Grants of up to $500 per applicant are awarded based upon the scope and community participation in the project. Projects need to:

    1. Improve the quality of life in Montana rural communities.

    2. Be planned and conducted by 4-H Club members.

    3. Show community involvement.

    4. Show adequate resources to complete the project.



Program/Project Title: Young Ag Couples Conference
Contact Person: Walt Anseth
Cost: $28,000
Target Group: Young couples with leadership potential involved in agribusiness and without the opportunity to attend other leadership conferences.

Description:
A three-day conference is held annually to provide these couples with leadership skills, expose them to new ideas or concepts concerning old ideas, and bring together members of Montana agricultural groups to improve relationships and communications.

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NEBRASKA

Program/Project Title: Nebraska Agricultural Youth Institute (NAYI) and Nebraska Agricultural Youth Council (NAYC)
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $80,000 per year
Target Group: High school juniors and seniors

Description:
Through the Nebraska Agricultural Youth Institute and the Council, the Department has been able to give thousands of high school students the opportunity to develop their skills and the abilities to network with other individuals from across the state. One hundred and twenty delegates are chosen on the basis of their past interest and leadership within agriculture. The delegates have the opportunity to share their ideas with local, state, and national speakers along with young people from all the corners of the state of Nebraska. NAYI is held during the second week of July. NAYI provides Nebraska’s agricultural young people the opportunity to carefully expand the influences surrounding their lives with fresh ideas, new friends, and the sense of community which covers the Cornhusker state. NAYI is a high priority for the Nebraska Rural Rehabilitation Funds because it is shaping the leaders upon which we will depend on for the future of Nebraska agriculture. The Institute is a program of probing, dissecting, and learning both about the world within, and beyond agriculture. For 26 years, the Nebraska Agricultural Youth Institute has provided these opportunities for young people. This would not have been accomplished were if it wasn’t for the creation of the same period of the Nebraska Agricultural Youth Council (NAYC). NAYC’s main goal has been the promotion and education of agriculture to the youth of Nebraska. The Council consists of 13 college-aged men and women appointed by the Director of the Department of Agriculture annually to serve an October 1 to September 30 term. The Council conducts activities throughout the year in order to educate youth of all ages and backgrounds on the importance of agriculture. The Council’s largest activity is NAYI. Throughout the year, they work together planning the events of NAYI with the diversity of each member’s ideas, as well as the common dedication and concern for the future of youth in Nebraska agriculture. The Council has consistently lined up an outstanding agenda for each NAYI.



Program/Project Title: Leadership Education/Action Development Program (LEAD)
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $10,000
Target Group: Agricultural leaders aged 25 to 40

Description:
LEAD provides promising young adults an opportunity to participate in a two-year educational program designed to enhance the future of farming, ranching, and agribusiness by developing future leaders. Established in 1981, the program helps to increase the participants’ knowledge of national and international economics and social change; creates a greater awareness of organizational decision making processes and the role of political institutions; and increases sensitivity to the needs of society in preparation to deal with issues impacting agriculture.



Program/Project Title: Ag in the Classroom Program
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $1,500
Target Group: Educators K-12


Description:
Provides training, support, and reinforcement for educators in helping young people develop an awareness of agriculture. It is designed to provide students in grades K-12 with a sound foundation on which to base decisions regarding agriculture as future voters and leaders.



Program/Project Title: Building Our American Communities (BOAC)
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $700
Target Group: FFA Chapters

Description:
The Rural Rehabilitation Funds pay for plaques and cash stipend for Building Our American Communities (BOAC) awards. The BOAC projects are Community Improvement Projects judged on a statewide basis.

We also sponsor the Agricultural Demonstration Contest which encourages the use of new and innovative agricultural techniques as students demonstrate through hands-on application.



Program/Project Title: Young Farmers and Ranchers Conference
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $1,500
Target Group: Young farmers and ranchers

Description:
The Rural Rehabilitation Fund sponsors keynote speakers at the Nebraska Annual Young Farmers and Ranchers Conference.



Program/Project Title: Stewardship Investment Finance Fund
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $100,000
Target Group: Low income, first-time farm buyers

Description:
To loan up to $100,000 through the Rural Investment Finance Corporation, a Nebraska nonprofit corporation, for the purpose of funding the working capital needs of the Stewardship Investment Finance Fund. The Fund will be used to establish a secondary market for purchasing farmland loans of low income, first-time farm buyers and providing those farmers with support services. The loan will be repaid over five years with an annual interest rate of 6.5%.



Program/Project Title: Lead Alumni Ag Adventure Tour
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $1,200
Target Group: *Emerging leaders in Nebraska, urban businesses and professions (*Alumni of leadership programs such as Leadership Omaha, Leadership Lincoln, and others, policy makers and government personnel)

Description:
The purpose of the Ag Adventure Tour is to seek common ground. Population-wise, the center of Nebraska is in Lincoln, but rural areas and its businesses are an important, vital part of this state. What happens “out there” impacts urban centers and vice versa. The Ag Adventure Tour is a joint effort of several rural and urban leadership groups to bring our state closer together in understanding and appreciation held during the second or third day in July. The two-day tour travels to farms, agribusinesses, and small towns in Nebraska.



Program/Project Title: Farm/Ranch Financial Checkup Program
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $59,125
Target Group: Nebraska Agriculture Producers

Description:
Nebraska agriculture producers are facing prospects of reduced income in 1998. Crop, hog, and to some extent beef prices are lower this year. Crop producers are still receiving transition payments from the government which help cushion the effect of low feed grain and wheat prices. These payments are fixed and do not increase as commodity prices drop, as the deficiency payments in earlier programs.

An added concern is that most crop producers are not positioning their businesses to deal with the end of the transition payments in 2002. The transition payments are significant to many Nebraska producers. For example, tradition payments average 25.4% of net cash farm income for producers in the Nebraska Farm Business Association average for 1997. The payment rate on corn in 1997 was 33¢ per bushel. This will gradually decline to 25¢ in 2002. Thus, producers will realize a very significant reduction in their income stream in 2003.

The bottom line is that many Nebraska producers may be experiencing financial distress in 1998/1999 due to low commodity prices and after the year 2000 due to vanishing government payments. It is important to note that the operating environment is different from 1984. At that time, practically all producers were experiencing financial difficulty - some worse than others. Asset values, particularly land and used machinery, dropped precariously as there was a shortage of financially able buyers. Financial institutions, including the Federal Land Bank and Farmers Home Administration accumulated large inventories of land. In 1998, we have a different situation. While many producers will experience financial stress, there is a significant number of other producers with healthy financial reserves. The latter group is positioned to buy out the former, especially at must-sell prices. The stage is set for a significant decline in farm numbers and an increase in farm size. A self-help educational program for those producers who are in danger of being cannibalized is certainly worth a try.

Producers need to be positioning their businesses to operate in this age of competitiveness. Profitability will depend more on a state of mind than on a type of business structure or size. Families participating in the Farm/Ranch Financial Checkup Program will have an opportunity to:

    • Think through their goals

    • Do a trend analysis of their financial position, performance, and key ratios

    • Determine their cost of production per unit

    • Project their cash flows for 1999

    • Evaluate alternatives for managing their risks

    • Think creatively about alternative uses for their resources

    • Evaluate alternatives for achieving their family and business goals.

The "Financial Checkup" program proposed here is to design to serve producers who are concerned about their financial position, but are not on the verge of bankruptcy. Our goal is to catch them while they still have alternatives to pursue. The "Checkup" program will help families deal with their situation in positive ways and lessen the probability that they will need financial mediation.

The "Financial Checkup" program is very similar to "Managing For Tomorrow." Each family would participate in a series of three day long meetings and would receive an individual follow-up visit. We propose that extension educators and existing "mentors" would be trained to teach the workshops. Mentors would do the bulk of the individual follow-up. Extension specialists would provide training, some teaching in workshops, and consultations to educators and mentors, particularly in the area of risk management.

We propose 20 workshops (each three days in length) possibly two per extension district with an average of 12 families (15 max.) per workshop. These would generally be held in locations where extension educators had a strong interest in the program. Families would be expected to complete assignments between workshop days. Families would pay a few of $75 to participate in this program.



Project Title: Farmers & Ranchers College
Contact Person: Stanley J. Garbacz
Cost: $7,500
Target Group: Farmers and Ranchers

Description:
The Farmers & Ranchers College was formed in January of 2000 with the purpose of providing high-quality dynamic up-to-date educational workshops for area agricultural producers in south central Nebraska through a collaborative effort between business, industry, and higher education leaders. While this type of partnership is not new to Extension Programming, the level of programming provided, promotion of programs and the amount of financial assistance from private industry is new.

We plan to provide high-quality continuing education to farmers and ranchers in a rapidly changing global agricultural environment. Furthermore, the Farmers & Ranchers College will provide the tools necessary so agriculture producers will be able to respond positively to these changes using a profitable decision-making process.

The Farmers & Ranchers College will:

    • Work closely with agribusiness and agriculture industrial representatives;

    • Work closely with the NU Cooperative Extension Division and the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources;

    • Work closely with other institutes of higher education;

    • Work closely with agricultural commodity organizations; and

    • Provide interesting, informative, and timely topics in a dynamic format.

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NEW MEXICO

www.NMRuraIRehab.com
info@NMRuralRehab.com

Program/Project Title: Low Income Housing and Farm Loans
                                 Tuition Assistance Program
                                 4-H and FFA Project Loans
Contact Person: Linda Stover, Executive Director
Cost: Loans are made as money becomes available
Target Group: Low income individuals and farm owners

Description:
Purpose and Terms of the New Mexico Rural Rehabilitation Corporation

The NMRRC is a 501 (C) (4) nonprofit organization. This corporation receives no funding from any outside source and is completely responsible for generating its own revenue.

At present the NMRRC provides low-income rurally-located home and agricultural loans. Escrow accounts are set up for the housing loans in order to pay their insurance and taxes annually. Agricultural borrowers are responsible for providing NMRRC proof of paid taxes and insurance annually on their farm property. NMRRC works closely with Farmer Home Administration on participating loans in which NMRRC holds first position mortgages. NMRRC makes loans independently without FmHA participation. FmHA is now part of The Farm Service Agency.

NMRRC has implemented a low interest Tuition Assistance Program. The pupose of the program is to provide low income rural students the opportunity to supplement any existing student loans or grants as needed to complete their education. The borrower is not required to provide any collateral for the loan; however, a creditworthy co-signer is required. Loans may only be used for actual tuition and registration fees and books, tools and equipment needed to complete the course. The student and co-signer must a New Mexico resident.

The Corporation also offers 4-H/FFA Special Projects Loans to assist young people participating in projects for the county and state fair the opportunity to purchase their animals. Funds are advanced to the borrower at a low simple interest rate. Repayment is expected within days of fair auction.

New Mexico Rural Rehabilitation Corporation History

In 1933, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the United States Congress founded the Federal Emergency Relief Act. This was a program designed to give aid to the millions of farmers and ranchers in the U. S. who were finding it increasingly difficult to make a living due to the great depression. Under this program, federal money was granted to private corporations to be disbursed to impoverished farmers and ranchers in an effort to keep this part of American culture alive.

In 1935, Rural Rehabilitation Corporations were established in 45 states. One-time federal grants were used to establish these corporations for use in rural areas and were to be overseen by the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. As a result of this, the New Mexico Rural Rehabilitation Corporation (NMRRC) was established.

In March of 1935, NMRRC began its rural rehabilitation by starting the Bosque Farms Project. This project consisted of 2,264 acres divided into 42 farmstead units ranging in size from 48.9 7 acres to 83.92 acres. Each unit generally consisted of an adobe dwelling, barns, poultry houses, and a Grade “A” dairy barn. Alfalfa was the principal crop produced, but the main source of income was from poultry and dairy operations. This project was developed and operated with funds provided by the Federal Government through the NMRRC.

In September of 1935, the Emergency Relief Administration became the Resettlement Administration, and the NMRRC—as well as other Rural Rehabilitation Corporations—were asked to transfer some of their money and property to the Resettlement Administration. This was to be done in trust for the corporations and was for management purposes only. The state corporations still owned the assets.

The Rural Rehabilitation Corporation Liquidation Act was passed by Congress in 1950 and became Public Law 499 of the 81st Congress. This law specified that the former Resettlement Administration, later known as the farmers Home Administration, was to return all of the assets to the state corporations that had been given to them in trust by the corporations. In 1958, the NMRRC—a private nonprofit entity—made application for and was granted the return of assets.

On September 27, 1974, a second amendment to the original Liquidation Act was passed by Congress giving the NMRRC sole proprietorship of its assets, funds, and property subject to the terms of a use agreement between the NMRRC and the Federal Government. The NMRRC is a completely private corporation, which is solely responsible for all its own management and growth and is subject to annual reporting and audit requirements by the United States Department of Agriculture under the terms of the use agreement between the two parties.

The NMRRC has been a member of the National Association of Rural Rehabilitation Corporations since its founding in 1971. Meetings of representatives from rural rehabilitation corporations were held that year in Biloxi, Mississippi, and later in Memphis, Tennessee, to officially form the national association for the purpose of discussing matters of mutual interest and finding new ways to assist people in rural areas of their home states.



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NORTH CAROLINA

Program/Project Title: Participation Real Estate Loans
Contact Person: Alex M. Lewis, Trustee
Cost: $3,854,582 in outstanding loans
Target Group: Low-income farmers who are unable to secure commercial credit

Description:
NCRRC participates with the Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the N.C. Agricultural Finance Authority in providing real estate loans to farmers who are unable to secure conventional credit for this purpose. NCRRC will provide 50% of the total loan up to $150,000 for the real estate purchase. In both types of participating loans, NCRRC requires “First Deed of Trust” on the property.

For existing FSA and NCAFA borrowers, NCRRC will provide funds for expansion of facilities, refinancing, and additional real estate purchases. In these types of loans, NCRRC requires FSA and NCAFA to subordinate their “First Deed of Trust” to NCRRC.

We do not make farm operation loans.



Program/Project Title: Building Our American Communities (BOAC)
Contact Person: Alex M. Lewis, Trustee
Cost: Currently $25,000 per year
Target Group: Individual FFA chapters through the State FFA office

Description:
An annual grant is made to the state FFA office for distribution to local FFA chapters based on recommendations made by the State Board. An annual report is made to the NCRRC Board at the end of each year, and the local chapters write to the Board explaining how they use their individual grants and wish to give their thanks for our participation.

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NORTH DAKOTA

Program/Project Title: Participation Real Estate Loans
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: $29.6 million in loans approved
Number of Loans Approved: 397
Target Group: Low-income farmers who are unable to secure commercial credit

Description:
NDRRC participates with the Farm Service Agency (FSA) in providing real estate loans to farmers who are unable to secure conventional credit. NDRRC requires a first mortgage and will loan up to 65% of the market value.

These loans have been for borrowers with FSA loans where FSA subordinates their lien to this corporation. Usually, this involves refinance of existing first mortgage loans which are either being terminated or have such high interest rates that the operators no longer have an adequate cash flow to succeed. Loans for the purchase of land and/or development are also made.



Program/Project Title: Nonparticipation Real Estate Loans
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: $11.3 million in loans approved
Number of Loans Approved: 151
Target Group: Low-income farmers who are unable to secure commercial credit

Description:
NDRRC provides direct real estate loans to farmers who are unable to secure conventional credit. Some of these loan requests are submitted by credit counselors on behalf of their clients and some farmers come directly to the corporation themselves. NDRRC requires a first mortgage and will loan up to 65% of the market value.



Program/Project Title: Subordinated Operating Loans
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Number of Loans Approved: 1,530
Cost: $500,000 per year
Target Group: Low-income farmers who need operating funds

Description:
These are short-term operating loans made in participation with the Farm Service Agency (FSA). FSA subordinates their lien on crops, chattels, and program payments. These loans are made in the spring and are due within one year or less.



Program/Project Title: Farm Business Management Grants
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Number of Grants: 3,182
Cost: $60,000 per year
Target Group: Young farmers from low-income households

Description:
NDRRC provides tuition for adult farmers to participate in farm business management programs sponsored by the vocational agricultural schools in the state.



Program/Project Title: 4-H Youth Program Grants
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Number of Grants: 2,031
Cost: $5,000 per year
Target Group: Youth from low-income farm families

Description:
The 4-H program of North Dakota has an Ambassadors Program using farm youth as leaders and many of them are unable to pay their expenses to participate. NDRRC approves funds for the farm youth leaders from low-income farm families.



Program/Project Title: Miscellaneous Research Grants and One Time Grants
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: Various amounts
Target Group: Agricultural entities

Description:
Provides funding on a case-by-case basis for studies and other projects benefitting small farmers.



Program/Project Title: Interactive Technology Support at North Central Research Extension Center
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: $85,000
Target Group: Active Farmers Threatened with Pests and Diseases that Damage Crops in Northwestern North Dakota

Description:
There is insufficient time for these farmers to obtain the necessary information on the pests and diseases and their eradication and too much distance for farmers to obtain the necessary education and advice in immediately attacking this disease and pest problems. This has been a unique problem in this area. Half of the farmers in this 12-county area are under financial stress that makes it impossible for them to help fund the technological equipment needed.

This region encompasses all the major soil types found in North Dakota, from glacial lake soils near Towner, to the Missouri Escarpment Soils on the west (soils that are 600 million years old) to soils on the east in glacial till prairies that are only 12,000 years old.

The importance of modern interactive technology to enhance and maintain the extensive privately owned commercial farming and ranching industry in this state is evident when the location of this region is considered. This 12-county region is 200 miles west of the Land-Grant University at Fargo. Nearly 300 miles south of the nearest agricultural research facility in Canada and over 500 miles from the Land-Grant University in Montana. The grant support of the North Dakota Rural Rehabilitation Corporation (NDRRC) to initiate and promote the capacity of the North Central Research and Extension Center (NCREC) at Minot, North Dakota, for interactive television and computer with these major agricultural centers is a unique contribution to site-specific agriculture and efficient operations.

In this region, the limited rainfall and variable soils require specific problem solving solutions. For example, in order to conserve moisture, soil and water conservation practices for tillage are commonly used which, in turn, may promote the development of stem, root, and leaf diseases due to the presence of spores in the plant needed to control erosion and conserve soil moisture. The occurrence of these diseases needs prompt diagnosis and recommendations for control. The crop advisor would, in this case, photograph the plant specimen on a digital camera, input the image on the computer and transmit it to specialists hundreds of miles away for an instant diagnosis and recommendation for control, all from the facility funded by the NDRRC. The same scenario is played out for insects and soil fertility problems, drought, and herbicide damage.

The NDRRC is also pleased to support the cost of the Interactive TV Conference/Classroom in this area for this project. The cost of the Interactive TV Conference/Video Classroom equipment with fiber optic system in the computer room will be $85,000.

The past few years have been devastating to farmers in this 12-county area since time has been the essence for action and the facilities were not available to assist farmers to identify the problem and find solutions to combat it quickly enough.



Program/Project Title: Fire Relief Assistance
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: $60,000
Target Group: Ranchers who suffered devastation from prairie fires along the Montana-North Dakota boundary and southeast of Watford City, North Dakota

Description:
The North Dakota Rural Rehabilitation Corporation was one of the major givers of financial assistance for 40 ranchers who suffered devastation from prairie fires along the Montana-North Dakota boundary and southeast of Watford City, North Dakota, on October 31, 1999. This financial gesture helped ease a huge tragedy from total despair to hope for survival and restoration for these ranch families. NDRRC gave them $60,000 as a grant mainly for trucking expenses to haul hay donated by other ranchers throughout the State and to move cattle to pastures in other areas. These ranchers and local citizens were overwhelmed by the kindness, generosity, and prompt action demonstrated by the North Dakota Rural Rehabilitation Corporation.

Fire destroyed 90 percent of the pasture in southwestern McKenzie County on 80,000 acres of grazing land, several hundred miles of fencing, many corrals, outbuildings, ranch equipment, one dwelling, and one power line. The biggest fire started from a controlled burn on the Montana side of the boundary which jumped into McKenzie County from those in charge of the control. A smaller fire started in the Squaw Gap area added 60,000 acres of burned pasture to the devastation.

When NDRRC learned that the most urgent financial need was funds to move donated hay to affected ranchers since they lost most of their hay, NDRRC arranged with local leaders to handle the Corporation funds. These funds were made immediately available without bureaucratic type constraint. It helped move 85,000 tons of hay needed promptly. This demonstration of administrative flexibility was an unbelievable boost to the morale of the people affected.

Corporation members are proud to have this nonprofit legal entity (the Corporation) that could act so quickly without delaying limitations placed on the recipients. Funds of $15,211 for 7,000 steel fence posts were promptly given in an “across the counter” fashion and was a miracle for the beneficiaries who were in such need for immediate action.

Members of this Corporation could sense the trend toward hope when it demonstrated its faith in local leaders to help the Corporation distribute NDRRC resources. This Corporation gave the local leaders broad authority to use the funds using their knowledge of the needs and identities of the ranchers who had suffered huge losses.

PROMPT ACTION was the need of the day for money to get feed quickly into the hands of the ranchers needing this help. The most needed was to move 85,000 tons of hay. Adequate funding for moving have considerable distances from North Dakota farmers around the state had not been forthcoming in sufficient amounts and time.

The following is an excerpt from a letter the Corporation received from a rancher severely damaged by this fire:

When a disaster of this magnitude occurs, the future looks very bleak. With 90% of our pastures burned, all our hay gone, fences destroyed, corrals burned, equipment and outbuildings burned, it was pretty hard to see the bright side. But it was there. We still had out home, no one was hurt, and we were about to experience the greatest outpouring of kindness, generosity and goodwill we had ever seen. I truly believe now that when something like this happens, that in the end, the good outweighs the bad.”

The Orphan Grain Train, with headquarters in Norfolk, Nebraska, a Lutheran group represented by a local pastor, was also a strong giver. There were several givers of smaller amounts of funds.

One local leader described the NDRRC gift as “overwhelming and is very much appreciated by the ranchers and the community.”



Program/Project Title: Emeritus Recognition of Special Retirees
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Number of Loans Approved:
Cost: no cost
Target Group:

Description:
This is a program to recognize the service and commitment to farmers and ranchers by Board members upon their retirement. The emeritus titles are honorary in nature.

The following are the requirements and conditions upon which the recognition is based:

    1. Emeritus titles are honorary in nature and will be granted to members of the Board upon retirement by the action of the NDRRC Board members.

    2. There shall be no salary, stipend, or responsibilities that shall accrue to the holder of Emeritus status. (Service to the NDRRC following retirement will be covered by a separate out-source agreement.)

    3. Emeritus persons will have rights to the office premises and services; e.g., telephone, fax, use of a desk, photocopier, and other office amenities.

    4. It is expected that Emeritus persons would serve as an ad hoc advisory committee to the NDRRC Board.

    5. The Emeritus persons would be eligible to attend state, regional, and national events by the invitation of the NDRRC Board and would be paid expenses incurred, including registration fee.

    6. This policy would be retroactive to the retirement date of Donald F. Giffey, in order to allow the Board to confer to him the title of Director Emeritus.

    7. The effective date of this policy will be January 1, 1997, as approved by NDRRC Board action on June 28, 2001.



Program/Project Title: Fire Relief Assistance
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: $66,800
Target Group: Ranchers who suffered devastation from prairie fires in Grant and Sioux Counties, North Dakota

Description:
The North Dakota Rural Rehabilitation Corporation gave financial assistance to 19 ranchers who suffered devastation from prairie fires in Grant and Sioux Counties, North Dakota. The fires affected 50,000 acres of land with the number of miles of fence that each rancher lost ranging from 2 miles up to 42 miles per rancher.

The Board of Directors of the North Dakota Rural Rehabilitation Corporation voted to provide a grant to the ranchers of $400 per mile of fence affected by the fires.



Program/Project Title: Operation Hayride
Contact Person: William Fortier, President
Cost: $50,000
Target Group: Ranchers affected by severe drought in 17 counties in southern North Dakota.

Description:
Operation Hayride was a program for ranchers in 17 counties in southern North Dakota affected by severe drought. There were approximately 4,700 ranchers with 425,000 head of cattle in the 17-county area. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres were made available, but transporting the hay where it was needed was a problem. Operation Hayride helped to offset costs for transporting hay by providing reimbursement directly to the rancher after documentation for fuel costs was received.

The Board of Directors of the North Dakota Rural Rehabilitation Corporation voted to provide $50,000 to Operation Hayride.

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OHIO

Program/Project Title: Soil and Water Conservation District Loan/Grant Program
Contact Person: Larry Adams
Cost: N/A
Target Group: County Conservation Districts

Description:
The funds of the Ohio Rural Rehabilitation Corporation (ORRC) are available to conservation districts so they can purchase tillage and grass seeding equipment to rent to farmers in their respective counties. Grants and loans are available; however, the loans are interest free and must be repaid within four years.



Program/Project Title: FFA/BOAC Grants
Contact Person: Larry Adams
Cost: N/A

Description:
The ORRC has given a grant to the Future Farmers of America (FFA/BOAC) for the past several years. These grants allow the chapters to perform projects which will better their communities and assist local farmers. The FFA is a national agricultural youth organization with over 400,000 members nationwide. There are over 18,000 FFA members in Ohio. Through citizenship, leadership, and cooperation, FFA members assist their community through Building Our American Communities (BOAC). Chapters take an active role in their community and also inspire other organizations to help carry out worthy programs. BOAC means action that stimulates economic development in local communities. The ORRC recently granted funds to interested chapters to aid in the southern Ohio flood cleanup.

The following is the criteria used by ORRC in selecting BOAC projects to be funded:

    1. The project must benefit rural residents or low-income farmers.

    2. The project must have a long-term impact on the community whether economic or improved quality of life.

    3. The project must be in collaboration with a substantial agency (e.g., OSU Extension, FmHA, and ASCS), governmental entity (e.g., city council, county, and commissioners), or loan standing organizations (e.g., United Way, Grange, and Ohio Farm Bureau).

    4. The project must go beyond legally required activities or functions that area routine expectations of an organization, agency, or governmental body (e.g. county fair maintenance, school landscaping, shop equipment, and handicapped accessing improvements on property).



Program/Project Title: The Governor’s Farmland Preservation Task Force
Contact Person: Larry Adams
Cost: $20,000
Target Group: American Farmland Trust

Description:
The ORRC granted $20,000 to assist in funding the Governor’s Farmland Preservation Task Force. Board members agreed that this could help implement a better way of life for Ohio farmers. Funding received from ORRC was used to assist in administrative costs such as providing staffing from AFT, conduct regional meetings, and compile information as to their findings. The main goal of the Task Force is to find ways to preserve Ohio farmland, protect private property rights, and still allow for economic development. A final report of the recommendations will be made to Governor Voinovich in June of 1997.

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OKLAHOMA

Program/Project Title: Loan Program
Contact Person: Gale Andrew
Cost: $4.5 million
Target Group: Oklahoma Farmers

Description:
To the extent possible, ORRC funds are invested in real estate loans with the exception of a reserve amount invested in a diversified growth portfolio. The agency has developed complete forms and working instructions for this loan program and applications are available on request. Funds are lent to those in the agricultural industry or aspiring agriculturalist for the purpose of growing or enhancing their farm business. Priority is given to lower income and small farmer applicants. Interest collected on loans are utilized on a revolving basis to make additional loans, provide scholarships, community grants and the Ag leadership program. Delinquencies in the program have been negligible.

The ORRC Loan Program began in 1970 as a participation program with Farmers Home Administration (now Farm Service Agency). ORRC takes first lien on the mortgaged real estate and although we still maintain the ability to utilize FSA as a loan partner this option is available as the need arises. ORRC attempts to stay in the small real estate loan category. Loan interest is compounded daily and most loans are set up with annual payments; more frequent payments and early payoff are always accepted without fee.



Program/Project Title: Scholarship Program
Contact Person: Judy Hite
Cost: $60,000-$80,000 annually
Target Group: Oklahoma High School Seniors who are planning to enter college or a technical training institute in Oklahoma

Description:
ORRC has maintained a scholarship program since 1968 and more than $3.5 million has been given to students. ORRC requires that scholarships be given to farm and rural youth whose families have limited resources and income. Rural youth is defined as students graduating from an Oklahoma Accredited high school whose community population is 20,000 or less. Students applying must be planning to attend an Oklahoma college, university, or technical training institute.



Program/Project Title: Oklahoma Rural Community Development Program
Contact Person: Gale Andrew, Judy Hite
Cost: $60,000-$80,000 annually
Target Group: Rural Communities and Community or School Groups

Description:
Oklahoma has maintained a community development program since 1977. Initially, this was known as the “Building Our American Communities Program” (BOAC). Approximately $1.8 million has been provided to rural communities since 1977 for BOAC and other community projects. The objective is to assist farm and rural communities to make improvements. This includes things which will help communities be a better place to live and encourage people to stay in rural communities and others to come live in the community. Approved projects will be provided ORRC grants with the community providing matching funds.



Program/Project Title: Oklahoma Agriculture Leadership Program
Contact Person: Gale Andrew
Cost: Up to $2,500 annually
Target Group: Young adults who are engaged in production agriculture or a related agriculture business who show a strong commitment to aspire to a leadership role to benefit Oklahoma agriculture.

Description:
ORRC provides an annual grant to assist with this program which consists of a series of seminars and study tours over a two-year period. The curriculum consists of a variety of subjects including leadership development, communication, government operations, and institutions, economics, resource allocation marketing and finance problems in agriculture, sociology and religious and cultural studies. The major issues that affect Oklahoma and U.S. agriculture will be studied. Those interested in becoming part of this group may contact Edmond Bonjour at (405)744-5132.



Program/Project Title: National Land, Pasture, and Range Judging Contest
Contact Person: Gale Andrew
Cost: Furnish personnel
Target Group: FFA, 4-H, adult leaders

Description:
ORRC assists in obtaining volunteers who serve as group leaders to the approximately 1000 contest participants who come from all over the United States to compete in the national contest which has been ongoing since 1952 and sponsored primarily by the Oklahoma Association Conservation Districts.

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PENNSYLVANIA

Program/Project Title: Agriculture and Rural Youth Organization Grant Program
Contact Person: G. Carl Muller
Cost: Grants up to $2,500
Target Group: Rural youth 18 years and younger

Description:
Fund projects which will increase the knowledge and awareness of agricultural and rural issues in Pennsylvania and, in particular, among the youth of Pennsylvania. The application period varies each year. Applicants may request guidelines and an application from the Bureau of Market Development or from one of the department’s regional offices. Grants are awarded annually by the Secretary of Agriculture on a competitive basis upon the recommendation of the State Agriculture and Rural Youth Development Board. Applicants are notified within 30 days of the decision of rejection or approval. The recipient will receive a grant agreement which must be signed prior to the release of funds. All grant money must be used within one year and the recipient must submit receipts to the department documenting project cost. Financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records pertaining to the project must be retained for seven years following the grant award and must be available for inspection or audit by the department.

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SOUTH CAROLINA

Program Name: South Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation (SCRRC)
Program: Direct Loan Program to Farmers
Contact Person: SCRRC Secretary/Treasurer
Cost: Available Funds
Target Group: South Carolina citizens with farm/forestry income needing:

    • Real estate loans to acquire, enlarge, develop, or improve farms, or to refinance farm related debt.

    • Operating loans to acquire livestock, machinery, equipment, feed, seed, fertilizer, pay farm and home expenses, or to refinance farm operating debt.

Security:
All loans are secured by a first priority mortgage on real estate.

Loan Amount:
Loans may not exceed 65% of the value of security unless:

    • A participation loan is made with Farm Service Agency (FSA). In such cases, SCRRC lends 50% of the loan amount needed and FSA lends the remaining 50%. The sum of the combined loans may not exceed 100% of the value of the security.

    • A guaranteed loan is made with FSA. When SCRRC, as an approved Guaranteed Lender, obtains a FSA guarantee against loss, the loan amount may be as large as 80% of the value of security. The loan recipient must pay a fee to FSA in the approximate amount of one and one-half percent (1.5%) of the loan amount for the guarantee.

    • Members of the SCRRC Board of Directors authorize a loan to exceed 65% of the value of security. This Loan Approval Committee is comprised of the President, Secretary/Treasurer, and two additional Board members.

Loan Terms:
The current loan interest rate is five and one-quarter percent (5.25%) fixed for the term of the loan which typically does not exceed 20 years. A shorter amortization period may be required for specialty-type operations, and in all cases when loan security has a shorter life span.

Administration of Loan:
SCRRC administers its loan program to support South Carolina agriculture in every possible way.

    • Bridge Loans have been made since 1975 to approved FSA real estate loan applicants when FSA loan funds are not available.

    • SCRRC grants funds annually to South Carolina 4-H, FFA, and to Clemson University to fund scholarships to South Carolina farm family members enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences. Our grant program was initiated in 1975 and has continued for 40 consecutive years. As of June 2015, the sum of contributions to these three organizations exceeds $2,387,000.

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SOUTH DAKOTA

Program/Project Title: Building Our South Dakota Rural Community Grants
Contact Person: Terri LaBrie
Cost: N/A
Target Group: 4-H Clubs, FHA/FFA Chapters

Description:
Approved youth organizations are allowed to submit applications for grant funds to perform community development and improvement projects. Grants are awarded on a competitive basis and based upon both the projects worth and community involvement. The program is designed to stimulate interest of young people in rural community improvement and provide a steady action program to help build future leaders of South Dakota. The Department of Agriculture works in cooperation with FmHA, FFA, FHA Associations, and 4-H extensions to review all proposals. Maximum grant amounts; basic-$750, and safety-$200. There is also a waiver provision for disaster related projects. The $750 CAP can be extended to $2,000 for repairs of a project damaged by floor, fire, or tornado.





Program/Project Title: Farm Link Program
Contact Person: Terri LaBrie
Cost: N/A
Target Group: South Dakota Residents

Description:
This program seeks to establish a directory of prospective beginning farmers and ranchers and potentially available farms and ranches.

Individuals interested in the program and wishing to obtain a directory can contact the Ag Development office or their local county extension office. There is no charge for this service.



Program/Project Title: Rural Development Loan Participation Program
Contact Person: Terri LaBrie
Cost: N/A
Target Group: South Dakota rural residents

Description:
Funds are available for loans for unique and innovative ideas, alternative agriculture, cooperative stock purchase, processing of ag commodities, especially those in surplus. Maximum loan participation, $300,000; term is 10 years; maximum participation is 80% of loan amount.



Program/Project Title: Value Added Livestock Underwriting (VALU) Loan Guarantee Program
Contact Person: Terri LaBrie
Cost: N/A
Target Group: South Dakota rural residents

Description:
The VALU program is open to any South Dakota farmer or rancher or farm/ranch laborer 18 years of age or older who gets at least 60% of their gross household income from production agriculture. The program is solely for purchasing livestock. There is a 50% guaranty on livestock “purchase money.” The maximum loan request is $200,000, term not greater than 26 months; the interest rate is set by the lender. The operator must have adequate feed and facilities available for the purchased livestock.



Program/Project Title: Livestock Loan Participation Program (LLPP)
Contact Person: Terri LaBrie
Cost: N/A
Target Group: South Dakota rural residents

Description:
The LLPP is open to any South Dakota rancher or farmer or farm/ranch laborer 18 years of age or older who gets at least 60% of their gross household income from production agriculture. The program is solely for purchasing livestock. The Ag Development office joins with a local lender in making a livestock loan. The two lenders share equally in the loan. Each providing 50% of the amount borrowed. Maximum loan request $100,000; term of the loan depends on the type of livestock loan requested not to exceed seven years.



Program/Project Title: Bridge Loan
Contact Person: Terri LaBrie
Cost: N/A
Target Group: FSA Approved Borrowers

Description:
The Bridge Loan program is available for approved FSA borrowers when FSA does not have available funding. The SD Department of Agriculture will make a short-term bridge loan until funding is available at FSA.

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TENNESSEE

Program/Project Title: Rehabilitation Corporation of Tennessee
Contact Person: A.C. Clark, President
Cost: Approximately $80,000 in college scholarships
Target Group: Deserving college students majoring in agriculture or home economics with a rural background

Description:
At present, the Rehabilitation Corporation of Tennessee Program is set up to help agriculture and home economic students in Tennessee get a college education.

The 115 scholarships we now provide go to six Tennessee universities that have agriculture and home economics departments. The university administrators are asked to use these scholarships to help students who have monetary needs and are from a rural background from the state of Tennessee.

In training these young people with rural backgrounds, we believe rural American will be the benefactor. We have seen evidence of these students actually going back to their rural areas as permanent residents.

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TEXAS

Program/Project Title: Rural Business Loans
Contact Person: Duane Martin
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Businesses in towns of 25,000 or fewer people

Description:
Small loans are made to rural businesses with strong management and a clear vision of where they are going in the future. Loans have been made to many types of rural businesses from agriculture processing to home health care. Fully secured loans are made at a prime interest rate. Higher risk loans for $50,000 or less are also considered at two percentage points above prime.



Program/Project Title: Guaranteed Student Loans
Contact Person: Leslie Janca
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Students from Texas towns of fewer than 25,000 people

Description:
This program includes a full line of guaranteed student loans including Federal Family Education Loan Program, SLS, and the increasingly popular PLUS loans to parents of students.



Program/Project Title: Rural Development Grants
Contact Person: Leslie Janca/Patty Wilford
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Organizations working to improve the quality of rural life

Description:
Rural Economic Development - The economy of rural Texas communities has long depended upon low-wage manufacturing and natural resource industries which are currently in decline. TRC is interested in projects which will strengthen the economy of rural Texas.

Rural Leadership - Population declines in some parts of rural Texas, and demographic changes in other areas, require new leaders with different skills than in the past. TRC is interested in projects which will identify and support these new leaders.

Education - All schools in Texas are being affected by fundamental changes, and the special needs of rural Texas are often neglected. TRC is interested in projects which will identify or address the special challenges faced by rural schools.



Program/Project Title: Special Projects - Development Operations for Rural Texas
Contact Person: Leland Beatty
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Rural Leaders

Description:
Development Option for Rural Texas helps rural leaders organize regionally to learn about implementing economic development programs which can be successful for small communities. This program receives funding from the Kellogg Foundation and the Meadows Foundation.



Program/Project Title: Special Projects - Risk Management for Rural Texas
Contact Person: Leland Beatty or Leslie Janca
Cost: N/A
Target Group:

Description:
Risk Management for Rural Texas is a program in which TRC has provided the risk capital and product design for a new insurance company dedicated to providing insurance for under-served rural markets. This includes affordable worker compensation insurance for rural businesses and agriculture enterprises and liability insurance for rural tourism programs including, but not limited to, hunting corporations.



Program/Project Title: Special Projects - Bottom Line Farming, Workshops in Agriculture Financial Management
Contact Person: Ron Presley
Cost: N/A

Description:
These management workshops help Texas farm families to:

    1. Reaccess where they are going in agriculture; and

    2. Put together realistic plans to get there.

This course is created as a short series of workshops, goal setting, and new financial management requirements and has received excellent reviews from participants across the state.



Program/Project Title: Internet RFD
Contact Person: Leland Beatty
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Rural entrepreneurs, community development volunteers, public officials

Description:
Local Internet access is crucial to the future of rural areas but has been slowed by the high cost/low demand ratio. TRC has built a constituency for the Internet among rural Texas through innovative projects that:

    1. Demonstrate how to use the Internet to make money in projects such as BluebonNet and Secret Places, which attract urban tourists to non-traditional locations. Participants in these projects reported a 30% increase in business attributed to this project.

    2. Provide educational resources to rural communities for continuing education and community leader research needs, as with our Development Options for Rural Texas Project.



Program/Project Title: Heritage Intervention Programs, Inc. (HIP)
Contact Person: David C. Galvan
Cost: $150,000
Target Group:

Description:
With the increase in juvenile crime in recent years, there is no question that we need new solutions to a problem which is becoming more prevalent in our society. Believing that intervention should take place before at-risk children enter the juvenile justice system, Heritage Intervention Programs, Inc. (HIP), operates programs for boys ages 7-13 using powerful minority historical figures to demonstrate personal responsibility and self respect with a strong anti-drug, anti-gang, stay- in-school message (ADAGSIS).

Each program involves a week-long summer camp to be held at Boy Scout Camp Sol Mayer in western Menard County. The camps offer outdoor activities and classroom lessons, focusing on history and heritage. Outdoor activities include regular summer camp recreation such as horseback riding, archery, and canoeing, as well as team building sports and games. What sets our camps apart from other summer youth camps is what HIP calls “heritage intervention.” In the classroom setting and outdoor education, counselors and staff blend lessons of heritage with building self esteem and the ADAGSIS message. Heritage lessons use the Hispanic culture of the vaquero, the hard working cowboy of south Texas.

A vital aspect for success with the youths is the Follow-up/Mentorship phase of the program. The Follow-up phase ensures lessons of positive personal values are developed and maintained throughout the school year. This part of the program involves one meeting per month during the school year in the home counties. A heritage lecture is given with a group discussion and a field trip or activity is held (examples include trips to museums, zoos, sporting events, etc.).

In addition to monthly meetings, HIP requires that mentors check in weekly with children for whom they have chosen to serve as mentors. While no more than three children per mentor is practical for the program, we suggest each mentor work with one to two children. We also expect the mentors to touch base with the child’s parents and teachers to monitor how the children are doing in school and in the community. Hip currently has Vaquero Heritage Program partnerships in Eagle Pass, Kingsville, Harlingen, Weslaco, Cotulla, and Carrizzo Springs, Texas.



Program/Project Title: YuleNet'97
Contact Person: Leland Beatty
Cost: $12,000
Target Group: Rural Internet Users

Description:
Texas Rural Communities, Inc. has been working closely with the board and staff of Texas Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund to devise strategics to maximize the adoption of Internet use in rural Texas. Even though the state has managed to put access in many rural schools and libraries, a need was documented to provide low cost efficient training to rural Internet users.

YuleNet'97 was the programmatic response to this need. Through this program, rural libraries were offered grants of $500 to hire a local college student to come home for the Christmas holidays and spend 80 to 100 hours providing local residents one-on-one and group Internet training. Over 1,000 rural residents were trained to use the Internet for business, education, and personal needs at 24 rural libraries in three weeks over Christmas.

The project also practiced what it preached. All of the students were trained to be trainers over the Internet, while they were still at school, through a set of materials prepared by TRC staff, coupled with e- mail and discussion group support.

The project was judged a success by the participants, and TRC is currently preparing a year-round project to accomplish the same goals in many more rural libraries. Out-of-state libraries are also welcomed to participate, but are not eligible for TRC grants.

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UTAH

Program/Project Title: Rural Rehabilitation Loan Program
Contact Person: R. Marlo Cloward, Loan Administrator
Cost: $2.1 million current in force
Target Group: Utah’s young farmers and ranchers

Description:
Utah has operated its Rural Rehabilitation Loan Program for the past 19 years as a revolving loan program. Interest rates are currently at 5% to 6%, depending on the type of loan, amount, and type of collateral. Loans are made for a maximum 10 years with a 20-year amortization with an option of a balloon payment and an opportunity to renew at the end of a 10-year term. The primary emphasis has been toward Utah’s young farmers and those interested in getting started in farming, but who are unable to obtain the necessary financing. Most funds have been used to purchase livestock, farm real estate, and farm equipment. In addition, many loans have been made to upgrade dairy barns, and, in some instances, finance an entire new barn and equipment.

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VERMONT

Program/Project Title: Vermont Rehabilitation Corporation
Contact Person: Leon C. Graves, President
Cost: Gross available dollars $200,000
Target Group: Extremely needy

Description:
The Vermont Rehabilitation Corporation is under the direction of a seven-member board of directors. We meet, at least annually, and more often depending on loan volume request. Our loans vary widely in size and term. For example, we have loaned as much as $100,000 to a group of maple syrup producers for purchase of their annual inventory with a six to nine month repayment. We have loaned as little as $1,000 with a five- year repayment. We are very flexible and responsive to need, but makes “security” for any loan a high priority.

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VIRGINIA

Program/Project Title: Virginia/Build Our American Communities Program
Contact Person: Sandra J. Adams, Director-Administrative and Financial Services
Cost: $6,000 per year
Target Group: Local FFA Chapters

Description:
Each Chapter is invited to annually submit an application for up to $350 in grant funds to serve as seed money to fund a community improvement project. We stress getting other groups, agencies, and individuals involved in local projects that benefit the entire community. In FY07-08, thirteen schools participated in community projects totaling approximately $5,900.



Program/Project Title: The Young Farmers Award Program
Contact Person: Sandra J. Adams, Director-Administrative and Financial Services
Cost: $1,500 per year
Target Group: Governor’s Young Farmers Award for Diversification in Agriculture

Description:
The program establishes a cash award program for members of the Young Farmers of Virginia to promote agricultural diversification. Many individual farms in Virginia depend primarily on one or two single enterprises for an overwhelming proportion of its income. When low commodity prices occur, many of these farmers are left in financial difficulty. This agricultural diversification program will encourage Young Farmers of Virginia members to add new enterprises or use other imaginative methods leading to further diversification of their traditional farming operations that will improve profitability, cash flow, and reduce financial risks. New enterprises, in addition to being economically feasible, should capitalize, where appropriate, on existing land, equipment, expertise, and markets.



Program/Project Title: Real Estate Participation Loans
Contact Person: Sandra J. Adams, Director-Administrative and Financial Services
Cost: $600,000 one time
Target Group: Low to moderate income farmers

Description:
This program began in 1975 and was implemented through a Memorandum of Understanding between the State Department of Agriculture and the State Office of USDA, Farm Service Agency. At the time, there was more demand for long-term fixed rate farm real estate loans than USDA, Farm Service Agency could fund. The state participated with USDA, Farm Service Agency in the making of farm ownership loans with the state taking first lien and the USDA, Farm Service Agency taking a second position on loans to primarily young, first-time farmers. As of June 30, 2008, all but three of these loans have been paid in full. The total outstanding loan amount due is approximately $63,000.



Program/Project Title: Real Estate Participation Loans
Contact Person: Sandra J. Adams, Director-Administrative and Financial Services
Cost: $500,000 one time
Target Group: Virginia Poultry Farmers

Description:
In 2004, a major poultry company closed one of its processing plants in the Shenandoah Valley. A group of local poultry growers formed a Cooperative in order to keep this plant operational. The Cooperative’s goal was to continue to provide local poultry growers with a buyer for their flocks and to maintain jobs in the community. The cooperative financed most of their start-up costs, but could not obtain financing from traditional financial institutions for the full amount. The Trust provided the Cooperative a grant for accounting and other related services associated with the start-up and two years of operational services of the Cooperative. The Cooperative continues to be successful in 2008.



Program/Project Title: Appalachian Sustainable Development
Contact Person: Sandra J. Adams, Director-Administrative and Financial Services
Cost: $5,000 one time
Target Group: Low income producers of organic vegetables

Description:
Appalachian Harvest is a network of 60 small organic farmers in southwest Virginia and northeast Tennessee. Appalachian Sustainable Development (ASD), a non-profit, operates Appalachian Harvest with the goal of developing sustainable, healthy markets for former tobacco growers and others who wish to stay on their small farms. ASD teaches farmers how to grow organic produce on a small commercial scale. The produce they grow is delivered to ASD’s packing facility where it is washed, graded, packed, marketed, and delivered to regional and national grocery stores. In May 2007, the Appalachian Harvest packing and grading facility burned to the ground. The building and its contents were a complete loss. A $5000 grant was made to the ASD for replacement equipment and for cleanup supplies due to recent fire at their packinghouse.

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WEST VIRGINIA

Program/Project Title: West Virginia Department of Agriculture Rural Rehabilitation Loan Program
Contact Person: Susan Baxter, Loan Program Coordinator
Cost: N/A
Target Group: Farmers and Agribusinesses

Description:
The West Virginia Department of Agriculture Rural Rehabilitation Loan Program (WVDARRLP) is a low-interest program designed to assist emerging agribusinesses and to help agribusinesses, farm operations, livestock operations, or other ag-related endeavors with expansion plans. The purpose of such loans is to aid the retention, expansion, or development of new or existing agricultural enterprises involving--but not limited to--the production, processing, packing, hauling, wholesaling or retailing of agricultural commodities or cottage industries for WV residents and WV based enterprises. The WVDARRLP makes its own loans and also partners with the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) in providing real estate loans to farmers who are unable to secure conventional credit.

Loans are made at the discretion of a five-member committee comprised of one employee of the WV Department of Agriculture (WVDA) and four outside members with experience relevant to both agriculture and lending. Interest rates are determined based on the applicant’s risk and are based upon either the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate or the LIBOR rate on the date of loan approval. The committee meets at least quarterly, with additional meetings as needed.

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WYOMING

Program/Project Title: Rural Rehabilitation Youth Leadership Training Program
Contact Person: Lisa Johnson
Cost: $20,000 per year
Target Group: Wyoming Youth

Description:
Leadership training and organizational competitions

Grants in the amount of up to $2000 are provided for youth leadership programs such as Future Farmers of America (FFA), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), Wyoming Ag in the Classroom (WAIC), Wyoming DECA, Skills USA, WY Family Career & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) to improve youth leadership through education and training.



Program/Project Title: Rural Rehabilitation Adult Leadership Training Program
Contact Person: Lisa Johnson
Cost: $13,000 per year
Target Group: Wyoming State & County Leadership Programs

Description:
Leadership training Grants in the amount of up to $1500 are provided for adult leadership programs that are affiliated with a state or county organization to improve conditions in agriculture and rural communities.

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